Welcome to Poetry Friday!

 

 

Everybody has a song,
be it short or be it long,
in the right or in the wrong key,
Like the hee-haw of a donkey,
Twitter, tweet, tu-whit, tu-whoo,
howl or growl or quack or moo.
[…]
Don’t be silent
nor afraid,
you must sing
as you’ve been made.

Translation by Stan Dragland of the South African poem “Elke outjie…” by Philip de Vos

Welcome, everybody, to this week’s Poetry Friday, which we are delighted to be hosting.  Please leave comments below with links to your “songs” and I’ll be updating this post throughout the day.

The above poem comes from the joyous anthology Under the Spell of the Moon: Art for Children from the World’s Great Illustrators.  This superb book, first published by Groundwood in Canada in 2004, then in the UK in 2006 by Frances Lincoln, is now available for the first time in paperback (Frances Lincoln, 2012). Produced by the International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY), the book is edited by erstwhile President of IBBY and founder of Groundwood Patsy Aldana, and has a thought-provoking Foreword by award-winning author Katherine Paterson.  It provides a fantastic showcase of 32 illustrators from across the globe, who have all donated their work to benefit IBBY – indeed 12.5% of the book’s proceeds go to IBBY.  Illustrators include Piet Grobler, who illustrated the poem cited above, as well as many others of my personal favorites such as Mitsumasa Anno (Japan), Peter Sís (Czech Republic/USA), Anthony Browne (UK), Isol (Argentina), Pulak Biswas (India), Luis Garay (Nicaragua) – and the book has also introduced me to many illustrators whose work I intend to explore further…

Each illustrator was asked to “illustrate a text of his or her own choosing, be it a poem, nursery rhyme, song, piece of prose, riddle or street game.”  The result is a wonderfully eclectic gathering of mostly verse that is given in its original language, sometimes incorporated into the artwork, and, where necessary, in English translation: and indeed a special shout-out must go to Stan Dragland’s virtuoso translations.  The quirkiness of the collection probably comes from this freedom of choice given to the global spread of illustrators: so each page turn brings a surprise, both in text and artistic style.  The one thing that links every page is the joie de vivre of the texts and the virtuosity each illustrator has brought to his or her contribution.

And now we turn to the eclecticism of the Poetry Friday gathering – what a joy it is to be hosting today!

 

Blythe revisits Peter Pan via Helen Marshall’s Skeleton Leaves.

Mary Lee has been as amazingly creative as ever: “I’m recycling words this week. I made a Wordle of some poems I wrote recently, then used only the words I found in the Wordle to create a new poem.”

Renee LaTulippe shares a video reading by Lori Degman (1 Zany Zoo) of her poem “A Snake Ate My Homework”, plus an interview with Lori and follow-up resources.

Liz Steinglass has four witty couplets animal couplets that I know will have me chuckling for the rest of the day.

Robyn Hood Black is “offering something hot and something cold from H. D. (Hilda Doolittle)” to help counter the heatwave in the US.

Joy has been posting poems all week based on her recent field trip to the Tambopata Research Center in the Amazonian rainforest – today she has A Room in the Jungle and challenges us to write a poem about “My Room”.

Tara brings sunshine to Poetry Friday with her focus today on Sunflowers, a poem by Mary Oliver, including a video reading.

Diane has a full platter of offerings – at Kurious Kitty’s Kurio Kabinet she has a very satisfying poem, “Perpetual Between” by Maggie Dietz; there’s a neat quotation from J. Patrick Lewis at Kurious K’s Kwotes; and an ekphrastic poem about “Degas’s Laundresses” by Eavan Boland at Random Noodlings.

Steven Withrow has a new poem, Cormorant that will have you grabbing the binoculars and heading for the sea, in your mind’s eye if you can’t manage it in reality.

Jama has a fabulous, lip-smacking feast today – oodles of brown-ness as well as a proposal for the UPS man… Excuse me while I go and raid my secret stash!

Heidi shares Denise Levertov’s What My House Would Be Like If It Were A Person as she reflects on her imminent move to a new home.

Irene Latham shares her favorite beach poem, along with her own poetic descriptions accompanying photographs of both of Florida’s coasts following a recent research trip.

Laura Shoven commemorates a very special meeting with Chu Chen Po’s Hedgehog: “I’ve been teaching the poem “Hedgehog” for years, but I met my first hedgehog last week. It was love.” Check out the beautiful photos too.

Carol shares Linda Pastan’s “To a Daughter Leaving Home” because her oldest son is moving to Phoenix to attend junior college today.

Jeff has a review of Out on the Prairie, a rhyming book set in South Dakota’s Badlands region.

Violet Nesdoly has an ode to a summer storm, “Lightning”, in a dramatic string of haiku format.

Linda Baie has a great review of our fellow-blogger Greg Pincus’ ebook The Late Bird, a collection of fifty of his witty, funny and thought-provoking poems first featured on his blog.  Go Buy!  (In her Poetry Friday post, Linda also asks us to take a look at her previous post – I’m glad she did – it’s a review plus giveaway of what looks set to becomg a very important book for teens feeling vulnerable because of their sexuality – The Letter Q.)

Andi at A Wrung Sponge has an original haiku with one of her equally beautiful photographs.

April Halprin Wayland says of her post over at Teaching Authors: “We teach you how to write a Hidden Words poem and give you a pretty stinky example of one I wrote. (We’re also announcing our latest book giveaway winner and talking about taking your writing to a different locale to refresh your creativity.)”  – And by the way, it’s not a “stinky” example at all!

Tabatha Yeatts focuses on James Flecker’s work today.

Iphigene continues Gathering Books’ focus on the Festival of Asian Literature and the Immigrant Experience with Emma Lazarus’ poem The New Colossus.

Janet Squires takes a look at Swirl by Swirl: Spirals in Nature by Joyce Sidman and illustrated by Beth Krommes.

Karen Edmisten has “some rambling”! This post about posting about poetry will make you smile and nod!

Father Goose aka Charles Ghigna has some new snickersome snickers – “a few for the funny bone”.

Amy Ludwig VanDerwater has a wonderful original poem about an imaginary mechanic.

Donna has “written about farming the land this week to add to my Tugging of Tides poem…”

Betsy has been inspired by Mary Lee’s Wordle idea (see above) and Teachers Write Camp.

Kerry Aradhya highlights the rhyming picture book Subway by Anastasia Suen and Karen Katz.

Lorie Ann Grover has an original haiku “Puckered Pear” (such a great title!).

Julie Larios is on a Poetry Roller Coaster at Books Around the Table (her critique-group blog):  “I offer up some thoughts about the up-and-down nature of my love of poetry, and I post a poem by William Jay Smith titled “Moon” which is not about the moon at all.”

Ruth brings us extracts from Wordsworth’s Tintern Abbey “in honor of the nature on our vacation”.

Jone has been inspired to write Summer Room by Joy Acey’s call at the beginning of the day to write a poem about “My Room” (see above).

Greg Pincus points to his interview on Katie Davis’ podcast  in which he talks “about poetry (and self-pubbing poetry, too). Ya… a self-reflexive Poetry Friday!”

What a wonderful Poetry Friday gathering – a veritable feast.  I know the day’s not over yet in some parts of the world so if any more links come in, I’ll update them on my morrow… in the meantime, happy reading!


38 Responses to “Welcome to Poetry Friday!”

  1. Blythe Says:

    It’s been a some time since I’ve been a part of Poetry Friday, but today I bring Skeleton Leaves by Helen Marshall.
    http://blythewoolston.blogspot.com/2012/06/skeleton-leaves-by-helen-marshall.html
    Revisit Peter Pan…

  2. Mary Lee Says:

    That book sounds like one I’ll have to own! Thanks for sharing!! And thanks for hosting the roundup!!

    I’m recycling words this week. I made a Wordle of some poems I wrote recently, then used only the words I found in the Wordle to create a new poem.

    http://readingyear.blogspot.com/2012/06/poetry-friday-wordle-poetry-quick-write.html

  3. Renee LaTulippe Says:

    Thanks for hosting, Marjorie. Oh my, the cover of that book is STUNNING. Love the whole concept – just put it on my list, so thanks for sharing!

    I’m in today with a poetry video by guest poet Lori Degman, author of the picture book 1 ZANY ZOO, who slithers in with her poem “A Snake Ate My Homework” : http://www.nowaterriver.com/poetry-monday-a-snake-ate-my-homework-by-lori-degman/

  4. Liz Steinglass Says:

    Happy Poetry Friday! Thanks so much for hosting today.

    I’ve posted four original animal couplets on my blog Growing Wild: http://www.lizsteinglass.com/

  5. Robyn Hood Black Says:

    Greetings from across the pond, Marjorie! Thank you for hosting and for featuring this book – will go on my list. I appreciate your joyous outlook today. :0)

    With the heat wave here in the US, I’m offering something hot and something cold from H. D. (Hilda Doolittle).

    http://www.robynhoodblack.com/blog.htm?post=862443

  6. Tara Says:

    Thanks for hosting today, Marjorie. I love the opening lines of that poem – this definitely sounds like a must have for my classroom. I’m in today with a summer poem by Mary Oliver: “Sunflowers.”
    http://tmsteach.blogspot.com/2012/06/poetry-fridayof-summer-sunflowers-and.html

  7. Diane Mayr Says:

    I’ll have to order Under the Spell of the Moon for the library–thanks for the introduction. Speaking of the library Kurious Kitty looks at “Perpetual Between” by Maggie Dietz. KK’s Kwotes shares a quote by J. Patrick Lewis.

    At Random NoodlingI have a ekphrastic poem by Eavan Boland.

  8. Steven Withrow Says:

    Thanks for hosting! Today at Crackles of Speech, I have an original poem about one of my favorite creatures: “Cormorant”:

    http://cracklesofspeech.blogspot.com/2012/06/poem-cormorant.html

  9. jama Says:

    That looks like a beautiful book, Marjorie! Will have to get a copy. :)

    Today I’m crushing on the men in brown and serving up my favorite brown foods: http://jamarattigan.com/2012/06/29/friday-feast-riffing-on-brown/

    Thanks for hosting today. You definitely deserve some chocolate!

  10. Heidi Says:

    Wow, what a treasure–and I need to find the entire text of the poem you’ve shared, which is something for a whole class of children to learn! (It reminds me of Lady Gaga’s “Born This Way” in the best possible way.)

    I’m in today somewhat in shock with a Denise Levertov poem about her house and reflections on suddenly having a new house. Thanks very much for hosting, Marjorie!

  11. Heidi Says:

    oops: here’s the link
    http://myjuicylittleuniverse.blogspot.com/2012/06/idly-you-understand-idly-we-had-been.html

  12. Irene Latham Says:

    Oh my goodness, that book looks delicious! I am a huge fan of art inspiring art, so I will definitely check it out. I’m back from a research trip with pictures from both Florida’s coasts as well as my favorite beach poem. Thanks so much for hosting!
    http://www.irenelatham.blogspot.com/2012/06/one-coast-to-another-and-back-again.html

  13. Laura Shovan Says:

    Hi, Marjorie. Thanks for hosting today! I’ve been teaching the poem “Hedgehog” for years, but I met my first hedgehog last week. It was love. I have pictures and the poem, by Chu Chen Po, at AuthorAmok today.

    http://authoramok.blogspot.com/2012/06/poetry-friday-i-am-formally-introduced.html

  14. Carol Says:

    My oldest son is moving to Phoenix to attend junior college today, so I’m sharing Linda Pastan’s “To a Daughter Leaving Home” today. Thanks for hosting!
    http://carolwscorner.blogspot.com/2012/06/poetry-friday_29.html

  15. Jeff Says:

    What a beautiful book cover! Thank you for sharing it with us. At NC Teacher Stuff, I have posted a review of Out on the Prairie. It is a rhyming book set in South Dakota’s Badlands region:

    http://ncteacherstuff.blogspot.com/2012/06/poetry-and-stem-friday-out-on-prairie.html

  16. Linda Baie Says:

    The book looks gorgeous, and what a wonderful idea. It will be great to see different illustrators from all over and also what piece of writing they chose. Thank you for hosting Marjorie. I’m sharing a review today of Greg Pincus’ new e-book, The Late Bird.

  17. Linda Baie Says:

    Sorry, I forgot my link: http://www.teacherdance.blogspot.com/2012/06/poetry-friday-gotta-book-flapping.html

  18. Andromeda Jazmon Sibley Says:

    Thanks for doing the round up today. I have an original haiga (haiku plus photograph).

  19. April Halprin Wayland Says:

    Hi, Marjorie…thanks for hosting today!

    At http://www.TeachingAuthors.com, we teach you how to write a Hidden Words poem and give you a pretty stinky example of one I wrote. (We’re also announcing our latest book giveaway winner and talking about taking your writing to a different locale to refresh your creativity.)

    Here’s our link:

    http://www.teachingauthors.com/2012/06/write-hidden-word-poem-for-poetry.html

    xxx,
    april

  20. Tabatha Says:

    Thanks for hosting! I’m sorry Sally is leaving :-(

    I have poetry by James Flecker today: http://tabathayeatts.blogspot.com/2012/06/words-for-messengers.html

    I love the cover for Under the Spell of the Moon, too — I (rather randomly) featured it in 2009 when I was talking about Caldecott awards.

  21. iphigene Says:

    Hello,
    thanks for hosting. THis is our contribution: http://gatheringbooks.wordpress.com/2012/06/29/poetry-friday-liberty-and-immigration/

    I love the first two lines of the poem…it echoes the thought of dancing to the beat of your own drums. :)

  22. Janet Squires Says:

    Thanks for hosting.
    My selection is “Swirl by swirl: spirals in nature” written by Joyce Sidman and illustrated by Beth Krommes.

  23. Karen Edmisten Says:

    I’m in today with some rambling, here: http://karenedmisten.blogspot.com/2012/06/poetry-friday-im-sorry-atticus-i-just.html

    Thanks for hosting!

  24. Father Goose Says:

    Thanks, Marjorie! A few for the funny bone @ SNICKERS

  25. Amy Ludwig VanDerwater Says:

    Oooh, want that book! Thank you for sharing it and for hosting too.

    Today at The Poem Farm, I have an original poem about an imaginary mechanic.

    http://www.poemfarm.amylv.com/2012/06/mechanic-imagination-poems.html

    a.

  26. Donna Says:

    I have written about farming the land this week to add to my Tugging of Tides poem…http://mainelywrite.blogspot.com/2012/06/ok-farmers-go-next.html

  27. Betsy Says:

    Thank you for hosting and sharing the book with us. It looks like a delight to the ears and a feast for the eyes, can’t wait to find it in my library! My poem is inspired by a suggestion from Mary Lee, Wordle and Teachers Write camp.

    http://teachingyoungwriters.blogspot.com/2012/06/wordle-inspires-poetry-thanks-mary-lee.html

  28. Kerry Aradhya Says:

    Hope I’m not too late for the party. Here’s my post for this week, highlighting the rhyming picture book SUBWAY by Anastasia Suen and Karen Katz: http://kerryaradhya.blogspot.com/2012/06/read-it.html

    Thanks for hosting today. I love the poem at the beginning of your post!

  29. Lorie Ann Grover Says:

    Thank you so much for your work today! At On Point I have my new haiku Puckered Pears.

  30. Julie Larios Says:

    Today at Books Around the Table (my critique-group blog) I offer up some thoughts about the up-and-down nature of my love of poetry, and I post a poem by William Jay Smith titled “Moon” which is not about the moon at all.

  31. Ruth Says:

    I have some Wordsworth today in honor of the nature on our vacation: http://thereisnosuchthingasagodforsakentown.blogspot.com/2012/06/poetry-friday-tintern-abbey.html

  32. Jone Says:

    Thanks Marjorie. Sounds like a great book. I have an original poem inspired by Joy Acey: http://maclibrary.wordpress.com/2012/06/29/poetry-friday-my-summer-room/

  33. Greg Pincus Says:

    Thanks for hosting, Marjorie. I’m up with a post linking to me talking about poetry (and self-pubbing poetry, too) on Katie Davis’s podcast. Ya… a self-reflexive Poetry Friday!

    http://gottabook.blogspot.com/2012/06/as-always-its-all-about-me.html

  34. PragmaticMom Says:

    I love getting exposed to poetry via Poetry Friday. It’s probably the only way to get me to read it!

  35. Marjorie Says:

    Thank you, everyone, for taking part in Poetry friday, and for your lovely comments about Under the Spell of the Moon – it’s definitely worth seeking out.

    Pragmatic Mom, that’s great :-)